Wednesday, 8 December 2010

YOU CAN MAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE TO YOUR CHILD


OK LET'S THINK of some ways of helping your child to make the best use of his vision. Suppose your child with CVI (we’ll shorten it to CVI - cerebral visual impairment is a mouthful) has a problem with scenarios like the following:

He does not seem to see or to notice something when it is surrounded by a crowd or an array of other toys;

Compared to other children he takes a long time to take everything in and make any sort of response;

He appears to take longer to focus his eyes on a toy you put in front of him;

On top of all this he does not even seem to look at toys in front of him. He feels his way when you know he can see (?). Or he looks and then he turns his head away and then he reaches out and grabs the toy while looking away. It is as if he cannot use his hands in combination with his eyes. And that is probably close to the truth.


THE KEY TO UNLOCKING YOUR CHILD'S WORLD is to think ‘ONE THING AT A TIME’.

NOW WE COME TO SOME PRACTICAL STRATEGIES: 

That means:      
Present one thing, one toy, one picture at a time. NEVER SHOW HIM TWO TOYS AT ONCE. That will only confuse him. He is not ready to make a choice just yet.

Introduce each object slowly:
YOUR CHILD LIVES IN A DIFFERENT TIME ZONE – A DIMENSION WHERE EVENTS HAPPEN SLOWLY

Do not lose your patience – you will need all the patience you have got – and a lot more.

Give him plenty of time to explore and examine objects. DONT RUSH HIM.

Work with one activity at a time. Don’t rush on to another just because you think he’s bored.

Keep to one sensory input at a time. Vision, hearing, touch but not all at once!

On the other hand sometimes you can gradually add the sense of touch to help him see.

Show him pictures and visual images in isolation without a background and strongly outlined.

Avoid figure-ground clutter.

Come on you guys - let's have your comments and contributions.I know you are out there... What do you think of the blog? Does it have potential?

3 comments:

  1. The first time I heard this phrase was when i moved to wales .. "Speak every other " ie dont but in ... tiss so difficult with your c.v.i. child... you want to clue... help... infact if .. you get past the pregnant pause ... which is a hell of a pregnancy sometimes.. the answers do come..
    I try to think of us now as being abroad... you know what i mean ??? as in not in Mcdonalds but in some cafe in crete ... you want food then sit and wait ... it will come .. but in the chef's own time ..

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  2. We found that cubbies for clothes worked a lot better for clothes than drawers. Drawers were hopeless. C would take everything out of her drawers and lay them all across the floor so she could see what she wanted. Cubbies helped her to see her clothes better.

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  3. I'm with Michelle, drawers are difficult unless they are small and intended for one item. The multi-colored bins on wooden racks work. He knows his Legos are in the green bin on the bottom shelf while his cars are in the top yellow one. Toy boxes are useless. He also has a set place for EVERYTHING and doesn't appreciate any deviation from the assigned spot.

    As for sensory input, yes, one thing at a time along with patience...more patience....then throw in a whole lot more! You will learn your child's individual needs and how he/she functions best. Follow their lead and don't let professionals tell you differently! For years his teachers - and many others - said he saw more than I gave him credit for. Really?! Last year, school gave him a full assessment in addition to a CVI range done by a professional trained by Dr Roman. They were appalled to discover he doesn't scan at all and only sees out of the inside portion of his left eye...meaning his vision was much, much worse than they thought it was. Case closed. They may be professionals, but YOU are THE expert on your child - period.

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